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June 2012 Briefing - Allergy

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Allergy for June 2012. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Impact of Cutaneous Lupus on Quality of Life Evaluated

FRIDAY, June 29 (HealthDay News) -- Cutaneous lupus erythematosus (CLE) similarly negatively impacts quality of life among patients treated at two different centers, according to a study published online June 18 in the British Journal of Dermatology.

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Supreme Court Upholds Health Care Reform Law

THURSDAY, June 28 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Supreme Court voted June 28 to uphold the constitutionality of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA), which has been the subject of debate and multiple lawsuits since its 2010 inception.

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Prenatal Exposure to Butylbenzyl Phthalate Linked to Eczema

WEDNESDAY, June 27 (HealthDay News) -- Prenatal exposure to butylbenzyl phthalate (BBzP), as assessed by increased concentrations of monobenzyl phthalate (MBzP) in the urine, is associated with an increased risk of early-onset eczema in offspring, according to a study published online June 26 in Environmental Health Perspectives.

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Duplicate Payments by Federal Government Increasing

WEDNESDAY, June 27 (HealthDay News) -- The federal government spends a substantial and increasing amount on individuals who are dually enrolled in separate managed care programs (the Veterans Affairs health care system [VA] and Medicare Advantage plan [MA]), according to a study published online June 26 in the Journal of the American Medical Association to coincide with presentation at the Annual Research Meeting of AcademyHealth, held from June 24 to 26 in Orlando, Fla.

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Use of Electronic Records Tied to Fewer Malpractice Claims

TUESDAY, June 26 (HealthDay News) -- Use of electronic health records (EHRs) is associated with fewer medical malpractice claims among physicians from multiple surgical and medical specialties, according to a research letter published online June 25 in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Obese Asthma Patients Have Reduced Treatment Response

MONDAY, June 25 (HealthDay News) -- Compared with lean patients, obese patients with asthma have higher neutrophil counts and a reduced response to corticosteroid treatment, according to a study published online June 12 in Allergy.

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Accidental Exposure Causes Most Reactions in Allergic Infants

MONDAY, June 25 (HealthDay News) -- For infants with documented or likely allergies to milk or eggs, most allergic reactions result from accidental exposures, according to a study published online June 25 in Pediatrics.

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Antimicrobials Tied to Allergic Sensitization in Children

FRIDAY, June 22 (HealthDay News) -- Antimicrobial endocrine-disrupting compounds commonly found in toothpaste and cosmetics are associated with a higher risk of allergic sensitization in children, according to a study published online June 18 in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology.

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Half of Residents Report Working While Sick

THURSDAY, June 21 (HealthDay News) -- About half of residents have worked while sick, with many reporting feeling obligated to colleagues and patients, according to a research letter published online June 18 in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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A Shift in Pediatric Drug Utilization Seen 2002 to 2010

MONDAY, June 18 (HealthDay News) -- From 2002 to 2010 there was a 7 percent decrease in outpatient pediatric prescription medication utilization, due in part to a decrease in antibiotics and allergy medication prescriptions, according to a study published online June 18 in Pediatrics.

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Child Food Allergy Prevalence Linked to Urban/Rural Status

FRIDAY, June 15 (HealthDay News) -- The prevalence of childhood food allergy is associated with urban/rural status, even after adjusting for confounding variables, according to a study published online May 17 in Clinical Pediatrics.

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Gender Gap Exists in Physician Researchers' Salaries

TUESDAY, June 12 (HealthDay News) -- A survey of mid-career academic physician researchers shows that gender differences in salary exist even after adjusting for differences in specialty, institutional characteristics, academic productivity, academic rank, and work hours, according to a study published in the June 13 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Effects of In Utero Smoke Exposure Seen in Teens

MONDAY, June 11 (HealthDay News) -- In utero smoke exposure is associated with poor asthma control and early-onset asthma in children assessed at 8 to 17 years of age, according to a study published in the June issue of the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology.

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Elimination Diet Can Treat Eosinophilic Esophagitis in Adults

FRIDAY, June 8 (HealthDay News) -- A six-food elimination diet can successfully treat adults with eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE), according to a study published in the June issue of Gastroenterology.

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Pollution Exposure, Obesity Linked to Poor Asthma Control

TUESDAY, June 5 (HealthDay News) -- Higher exposure to traffic pollutants and obesity increase the likelihood of poor asthma control in older adults, according to a study published in the June issue of the Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology.

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Skin Testing Not Sufficient to ID Contrast Media Sensitivity

FRIDAY, June 1 (HealthDay News) -- More than 50 percent of patients with nonimmediate reactions to iodinated contrast media (CM) are identified with the drug provocation test (DPT) and not with skin testing, according to a study published online May 15 in Allergy.

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