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Airborne Pollen & Allergy Season

Last Updated: 6/19/2014
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Find Out More About:
Hay Fever (Allergic Rhinitis) or other respiratory allergies.
Asthma which can be triggered by allergies or weather (check your Weather Forecast!).
Your Reaction to Allergens - the symptoms we call allergies.
Treatment Options for Hay Fever.
Other Helpful Information:
The following links take you to Web sites outside of Pollen.com which also contain useful allergy information. These sites will open in a new window.
Visit PollenLibrary.com to find out what kind of pollen is causing asthma and allergy in your area now.

For many allergy sufferers, pollen can be a vicious word reminiscent of many sneezy, unhealthy days and nights. How can fine powder released from flowering plants affect our senses so greatly?

To explain…pollen is a plant’s only form of reproduction and it’s produced in mass quantities. It’s carried in the air and can land in a person’s eyes, nose, lungs and on skin.

For people with allergies, pollen is an allergen that causes an allergic reaction. Their immune system treats the pollen as an invader and responds by mobilizing to attack by producing large amounts of antibody. This allergic reaction can cause the following symptoms: itchy watery eyes, runny nose, itchy throat, hives, fatigue, and irritability.

When is Pollen Season?

Pollens spread by the wind. Pollen from trees, grasses, and weeds are the main cause of allergies. Spring is not the only allergy season, many plants pollinate year round. Your location will determine the time and duration of your pollen season. Pollen counts will vary from day to day as well as hour to hour.

Different Pollens for Each Pollen Season

In springtime, pollen from the trees begins its release between January and April, depending on the climate and location. These trees include elm, pine, birch, ash, hickory, poplar, and cypress…to name a few.

Summertime is when grass pollen reigns supreme: pollen from northern grass in colder climates, such as timothy, rye, and blue; and southern grass pollens in the warmer climates, such as Bermuda Grass.

In the fall, typically weed pollen takes control. These weeds include ragweed, nettle, mugwort, fat hen and sorrel.

Track Pollen Levels in Your Area

If you want to know the allergy levels for your location, Pollen.com provides you with the tools to track pollen in your hometown and across the nation.

Whether you’re traveling or staying home, we can give you the allergy forecast you need. Pollen season can last all year round, so tracking your local pollen count can help you manage your allergies. Protect yourself from pollen season…
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Any medical or health information included on Pollen.com is provided by IMS Health Incorporated, a non-medical professional organization. Information from external sources included on Pollen.com, including HealthDay News, are the responsibility of the third-party provider and not of IMS Health Incorporated.