Health Tip: Some Facts About Angiodema

(HealthDay News) -- Angiodema is the medical term for hive-like swelling beneath the skin. It's often caused by an allergic reaction.

The U.S. National Library of Medicine mentions these common triggers for angiodema:

  • Outdoor allergens, such as pollen.
  • Animal dander.
  • Exposure to significant heat, cold, sunlight or water.
  • Foods that cause allergies in many people, such as milk, nuts, shellfish or eggs.
  • An insect bite or sting.
  • Certain medications, such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), blood pressure drugs, and certain antibiotics such as penicillin.

If someone has difficulty breathing in addition to the swelling, seek emergency medical treatment immediately.

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