Health Tip: Listen to Your Child About Food Allergies

(HealthDay News) -- If a young child has an allergic reaction to food, the child may not know how to clearly communicate what's happening.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says children may complain of:

  • Something poking the tongue, or feeling like there is hair on the tongue.
  • The tongue or mouth is itching, burning or tingling.
  • A feeling that the tongue is heavy.
  • A feeling of something stuck in the throat.
  • A tight feeling in the lips, a bump in the throat or on the back of the tongue, or a thick feeling in the throat.
  • A feeling like there are bugs in one or both ears.

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