Health Tip: Climate Can Affect Allergies

(HealthDay News) -- Allergies can make the coming of a new season miserable. The American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology explains how:

  • Pollen from ragweed and trees tends to ramp up when the nights are cool and days warm. The morning hours tend to be highest for pollen counts.
  • High humidity and high temperatures can promote rapid growth of mold.
  • While rain can help wash away pollen, counts can soar when the rain ends.
  • Days without wind are best for those with allergies.
  • It's just about impossible to escape seasonal allergens simply by moving to a new location. Allergens lurk just about everywhere.

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